June 25, 2013

What we wear matters

Stephen Kriss, writing in the June 10 issue of  Mennonite World Review, says:  "Our plain brothers and sisters are right. What we wear matters.  We learned that this spring when a factory collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh.  I winced as I listened to the news, wondering if a brand I prefer to purchase might be listed among the contractors at Rana Plaza. I knew I owned clothes tagged "Made in Bangladesh."

The images from Rana Plaza raised our consciousness about justice and labor and the clothes we wear.  While the Amish and others committed to simple living might have an advantage by eschewing technology and some mass-produced goods, it's pretty tough to extract ourselves from the global supply chain.   read article
Our plain brothers and sisters are right. What we wear matters. We learned that this spring when a factory collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. I winced as I listened to the news, wondering if a brand I prefer to purchase might be listed among the contractors at Rana Plaza. I knew I owned clothes tagged, “Made in Bangladesh.” - See more at: http://www.mennoworld.org/2013/6/10/what-we-wear-matters/#sthash.7bdGBQAJ.dpuf
Our plain brothers and sisters are right. What we wear matters. We learned that this spring when a factory collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. I winced as I listened to the news, wondering if a brand I prefer to purchase might be listed among the contractors at Rana Plaza. I knew I owned clothes tagged, “Made in Bangladesh.” - See more at: http://www.mennoworld.org/2013/6/10/what-we-wear-matters/#sthash.7bdGBQAJ.dpuf
Our plain brothers and sisters are right. What we wear matters. We learned that this spring when a factory collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. I winced as I listened to the news, wondering if a brand I prefer to purchase might be listed among the contractors at Rana Plaza. I knew I owned clothes tagged, “Made in Bangladesh.”
Kriss
Kriss
The images from Rana Plaza raised our consciousness about justice and labor and the clothes we wear. While the Amish and others committed to simple living might have an advantage by eschewing technology and some mass-produced goods, it’s pretty tough to extract ourselves from the global supply chain.
Secondhand clothing is plentiful and cheap in developed markets because of inexpensive new clothing mostly produced far away. Whether we are buying at thrift shops, discount outlets, department stores or high-end boutiques, we are all implicated at some level in the global apparel trade. Even plain dress requires globally produced fabric.
- See more at: http://www.mennoworld.org/2013/6/10/what-we-wear-matters/#sthash.7bdGBQAJ.dpuf
Our plain brothers and sisters are right. What we wear matters. We learned that this spring when a factory collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. I winced as I listened to the news, wondering if a brand I prefer to purchase might be listed among the contractors at Rana Plaza. I knew I owned clothes tagged, “Made in Bangladesh.”
Kriss
Kriss
The images from Rana Plaza raised our consciousness about justice and labor and the clothes we wear. While the Amish and others committed to simple living might have an advantage by eschewing technology and some mass-produced goods, it’s pretty tough to extract ourselves from the global supply chain.
Secondhand clothing is plentiful and cheap in developed markets because of inexpensive new clothing mostly produced far away. Whether we are buying at thrift shops, discount outlets, department stores or high-end boutiques, we are all implicated at some level in the global apparel trade. Even plain dress requires globally produced fabric.
- See more at: http://www.mennoworld.org/2013/6/10/what-we-wear-matters/#sthash.7bdGBQAJ.dpuf